Close cookie details

This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Hide notification

  Main Nav
What Makes an Apple?
Cover of What Makes an Apple?
What Makes an Apple?
Six Conversations About Writing, Love, Guilt, and Other Pleasures
by Amos Oz
Borrow Borrow

Revelatory talks about art and life with internationally acclaimed Israeli novelist Amos Oz
In the last years of his life, the writer Amos Oz talked regularly with Shira Hadad, who worked closely with him as the editor of his final novel, Judas. These candid, uninhibited dialogues show a side of Oz that few ever saw. What Makes an Apple? presents the most revealing of these conversations in English for the first time, painting an illuminating and disarmingly intimate portrait of a towering literary figure.
In frank and open exchanges that are by turns buoyant, introspective, and argumentative, Oz explains what impels him to begin a story and shares his routines, habits, and challenges as a writer. He discusses the tectonic changes he experienced in his lifetime in relationships between women and men, and describes how his erotic coming of age shaped him not only as a man but also as an author. Oz reflects on his parents, his formative years on a kibbutz, and how he dealt with and learned from his critics, his students, and his fame. He talks about why there is more humor in his later books and gives his exceptional take on fear of death.
Resonating with Oz's clear, honest, and humorous voice, What Makes an Apple? offers unique insights about Oz's artistic and personal evolution, and enables readers to explore his work in new ways.

Revelatory talks about art and life with internationally acclaimed Israeli novelist Amos Oz
In the last years of his life, the writer Amos Oz talked regularly with Shira Hadad, who worked closely with him as the editor of his final novel, Judas. These candid, uninhibited dialogues show a side of Oz that few ever saw. What Makes an Apple? presents the most revealing of these conversations in English for the first time, painting an illuminating and disarmingly intimate portrait of a towering literary figure.
In frank and open exchanges that are by turns buoyant, introspective, and argumentative, Oz explains what impels him to begin a story and shares his routines, habits, and challenges as a writer. He discusses the tectonic changes he experienced in his lifetime in relationships between women and men, and describes how his erotic coming of age shaped him not only as a man but also as an author. Oz reflects on his parents, his formative years on a kibbutz, and how he dealt with and learned from his critics, his students, and his fame. He talks about why there is more humor in his later books and gives his exceptional take on fear of death.
Resonating with Oz's clear, honest, and humorous voice, What Makes an Apple? offers unique insights about Oz's artistic and personal evolution, and enables readers to explore his work in new ways.

Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Text Difficulty:


About the Author-
  • Amos Oz (1939–2018) was a world-renowned novelist, essayist, and short-story writer. His many books include A Tale of Love and Darkness, Scenes from Village Life, and How to Cure a Fanatic (Princeton). Shira Hadad is an acclaimed editor of contemporary Israeli fiction and a screenwriter. She edited works by such writers as Amos Oz and Zeruya Shalev, and created TV dramas for various networks. Jessica Cohen is the translator of Amos Oz's Dear Zealots and of works by such writers as Etgar Keret, Ronit Matalon, and Nir Baram.
Reviews-
  • Kirkus

    December 15, 2021
    Perspectives on life and literature from one of Israel's most celebrated authors. In 2014, Hadad edited Judas, the final novel by Israeli novelist Oz (1939-2018). After that, their conversations continued periodically during the final four years of Oz's life, resulting in "dozens of recorded hours" of occasionally contentious conversations. In these six chats, Oz lyrically addresses such topics as his motivations as a writer, writing process, views on sexuality, decades on a kibbutz, and the ways in which his writing changed from early successes to later works such as A Tale of Love and Darkness (2005). Ask an opinionated person like Oz for opinions, and one is likely to get provocative answers, but most of his responses are benign, as when he states that writing never gets easier: "writing is like driving with one foot on the gas and one on the brakes the whole time." More disturbing are comments on "militant feminism" and his fear that the #MeToo movement "is in danger of sliding down the slippery slope from understandable and justifiable revolutionary zeal to Bolshevik cruelty." In another conversation, Oz complains that much of modern literature "is nothing but agendas or a cunning attempt to disguise agendas" and executed with a "totalitarian steamroller," a shift that makes the teaching of literature "like being an explosives specialist neutralizing a suspicious object." Readers can decide for themselves whether they concur with him or, like Hadad, strongly disagree. Fortunately, most of the book consists of witty observations on writing and more, and Oz shares a reassuring analogy for writers who get frustrated when the work goes poorly: "What you do is actually similar to a grocer's job. You come to work in the morning, you open up the shop, you sit there and wait for customers. If there are customers, it's a good day. If there aren't, you're still doing your job by sitting there waiting." Memorable viewpoints guaranteed to evoke strong feelings.

    COPYRIGHT(2021) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Publisher's Weekly

    January 31, 2022
    Six conversations between Israeli novelist Oz (1939–2018) (A Tale of Love and Darkness) and screenwriter Hadad come together in this pleasant if scattershot collection. Their chats touch on such topics as Oz’s childhood (“I was an only child and I did not have any friends”), his adult relationships, writing habits (“My main ritual is to have everything in its place”), and the Israel-Palestine conflict (Oz calls “reality strikes” such as intifadas and bloodshed much more influential on how people see the situation than op-eds). Among the most memorable commentary is on the writer’s craft; in reflecting on his writing, Oz says that “no writer... can write about a person more intelligent than him or her,” nor can they persuasively depict someone with a better sense of humor than themselves. These two limitations notwithstanding, Oz suggests that he relishes writing about characters who are different from him. Though there are many such insightful comments, it’s hard to tell what the point is—at times the only thing holding the conversations together is Oz’s personality, which won’t be enough for those not already enamored of the author’s work. For his fans, though, this works as a quick fix.

  • "Perspectives on life and literature from one of Israel's most celebrated authors. . . . Oz lyrically addresses such topics as his motivations as a writer, writing process, views on sexuality, decades on a kibbutz, and the ways in which his writing... "Perspectives on life and literature from one of Israel's most celebrated authors. . . . Oz lyrically addresses such topics as his motivations as a writer, writing process, views on sexuality, decades on a kibbutz, and the ways in which his writing changed from early successes to later works. . . . Memorable viewpoints guaranteed to evoke strong feelings."
Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Princeton University Press
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

Status bar:

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You've reached the maximum number of titles you can recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 99 titles every 1 day(s).

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

Close

Enhanced Details

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

MP3 audiobooks are only supported on macOS 10.6 (Snow Leopard) through 10.14 (Mojave). Learn more about MP3 audiobook support on Macs.

Close

Please update to the latest version of the OverDrive app to stream videos.

Close

Device Compatibility Notice

The OverDrive app is required for this format on your current device.

Close

Bahrain, Egypt, Hong Kong, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
What Makes an Apple?
What Makes an Apple?
Six Conversations About Writing, Love, Guilt, and Other Pleasures
Amos Oz
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.
Close
Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

You will be prompted to sign into your library account on the next page.

If this is your first time selecting “Send to NOOK,” you will then be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel